More Revealed

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More Revealed: A Critical Analysis of Alcoholics Anonymous and the Twelve Steps
aka The Real AA: Behind the Myth of Twelve Step Recovery (See Sharp edition title)
by Ken Ragge
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Alice Miller says,
"[More Revealed] will be a shock to many people because it reveals facts they would rather not know. But the shock, I have no doubt, will be a healthy one."
-- Alice Miller is famous as author of The Drama of the Gifted Child, For Your Own Good: The Hidden Roots of Cruelty in Childrearing and the Roots of Violence, and Breaking Down the Wall of Silence among other books.

Stanton Peele says,
"It's great. [T]he best overall analysis I've seen of the roots, nature, consequences, and failures of AA. ...summary of relevant research is excellent and to the point. ... remarkably well written."
-- social psychologist Stanton Peele is author of The Meaning of Addiction and The Diseasing of America.

G. Alan Marlatt says,
"interesting and informing reading ... I admire your courage to bring up the issues so clearly."
-- G. Alan Marlatt, Ph.D., Professor and Director Addictive Behaviors Research Center, University of Washington

Jack Trimpey says,
"a landmark in America's return to sanity in addiction care. ... the kind of book many would like to censor ...a reading responsibility for people in the helping professions."
-- Jack Trimpey, Executive Director of Rational Recovery Self-Help Network (now in 500 cities) in The Journal of Rational Recovery

And the public says,

"I have always sensed there was something wrong with twelve step programs. Since everyone else seemed to think they were great, I assumed I didn't understand them completely or perhaps I was in 'denial.' ... More Revealed has helped me understand the cultism and dependence inherent in these programs. If this information had been available to my mother 25 years ago, she might still be alive."
-- Martha White

"More Revealed is making its way gradually around our office and everyone thinks the book is about them, and they have this funny little way of getting ever so slightly possessive about it, as though they alone truly understood the secrets held within. So Ken, hordes of people think you've written a book just for them, and so you have."
-- Jeanine B., Florida reader

>"I hated this book. I used to think I was an alcoholic and there was nothing I could do about it except drink. Now I have to take responsibility."
-- John B.

"Brilliant"
-- Carol King, M.P.H., Yale University, author of Poverty and Medical Care

"After reading More Revealed, I now understand why AA members are among the most disoriented, desperate and lost callers I have handled."
-- Ron W., Suicide Hotline Counselor

"Those who read this book could die."
-- Thomas F., twelve stepper who found this book too frightening to read

"This book should be required reading for anyone who wants to be a therapist."
-- Erma Epple, MA

"It opened my eyes..."
-- Bonnie Guerra

"After reading this book I am more convinced that I must trust my own intuition more than anything else and march to the beat of my own drummer."
-- Carlos Grado, social worker

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Twelve Step Horror Stories: True Tales of Misery, Betrayal and Abuse in NA, AA
and 12-Step Treatment

edited Rebecca Fransway, Ed.
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“Those in this book are incredibly brave. Instead of sinking into a hole (‘jails, institutions, or death’) after rejecting AA, as AA told them they would, they've stood on their own two feet and have dared challenge a sacrosanct American icon.” — Stanton Peele, Author of Love and Addiction, Diseasing of America, Resisting 12-Step Coercion

“Through this book, Rebecca Fransway is doing a great service to those who are considering joining or are being forced into the step groups; this collection of stories will reveal to them that ‘the loving hand of AA’ is often quite different from its wall-poster image. “The gift that Rebecca and the scores of personal accounts in this book offer is the knowledge that, no, you are not crazy; no, you are not alone; and yes, there is life after leaving the step groups.” — Ken Ragge, Author of The Real AA

12-Step Horror Stories graphically reveals America's most under-reported scandal — that 12-step groups and 12-step treatment are usually ineffective and all too often are actively harmful.” —Charles Bufe, Author of Alcoholics Anonymous: Cult or Cure?

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Alcoholics Anonymous: Cult or Cure?
by Charles Bufe
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From Library Journal
Bufe ( The Heretic's Handbook of Quotations , See Sharp Pr., 1988) scrutinizes Alcoholics Anonymous, delving into the organization's origins and development. Tracing its roots to the Oxford Group movement, which was a revival of the Church of England begun in 1833, he demonstrates how major tenets of AA are derived from Oxford Group principles. He includes colorful details concerning organization founders. In critiquing the 12 steps, which are the heart of the AA recovery program, he leans heavily on the work of psychologist Albert Ellis. Bufe considers the AA religio-spiritual emphasis anathema. He also objects to AA's espousal of individual culpability for alcoholism, which does not acknowledge socioeconomic influences. His conclusion is that AA is a quasi-cult, devoid of harmful excesses but demanding strict adherence from its membership. Despite his purported objectivity, his secular bias is very much in evidence. The appendix includes descriptions of secular-based alcoholic recovery programs, and also a secular version of the 12 steps. — Carol R. Glatt, VA Medical Ctr. Lib., Philadelphia © 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Independent Publisher
Charles Bufe tried AA in 1983, hated it, and kept drinking until 1985, when he achieved sobriety on his own. Clearly, Bufe has something of an ax to grind, but for the most part he grinds it fairly. (At worst, the author's skepticism is no more extreme than the zeal of some AA supporters.) Bufe poses two major questions - Is AA religious? Is it a cult? - and raises some interesting points along the way. He traces the program's religious overtones to the Oxford Group Movement of the 1930s. This movement, he argues, heavily influenced AA founder Bill Wilson. Bufe supports his thesis with detailed, if not always fascinating, quotes and parallels. He concludes that AA is religious, a label sure to rile members who consider their program a secular one. His other conclusion - that AA isn't a cult - is only common sense: AA has no leader, makes no financial demands, and does not use highpressure tactics. Bufe raises a timely point regarding the seemingly endless spin-off groups that have adopted AA's 12 steps as their own. How do victims, such as members of Incest Survivors Anonymous, profit from steps designed for the addicted? Appendices include secular alternatives to AA and the 12 Steps.

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Resisting 12-Twelve Step Coercion: How to Fight Forced Participitation in AA, NA,
or 12-Step Treatment

by Stanton Peele and Charles Bufe with Archie Brodsky
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from the cover: Every year 1,000,000 Americans are coerced into Alcoholics Anonymous, Narcotics Anonymous, and 12-step treatment. Many of these people are neither alcoholics or drug addicts. Even for those who do abuse alcohol or drugs, coerced treatment does little good, and often amounts to little more than religious indoctrination. Coerced 12-step participation has, however, been successfully challenged several times in recent years in appeal-level courts on constitutional grounds (as a violation of the First Amendment's “Establishment Clause”). But the Supreme Court has yet to rule on the issue, and even in parts of the country where courts have ruled against it, 12-step coercion continues on a massive scale. If you, a loved one, or a client are being forced to participate in a 12-step group or 12-step treatment, this book will give you the information you need to challenge that forced participation — to resist 12-step coercion.

Saints Run Mad
by Marjorie Harrison
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First published in 1934, "Saints Run Mad" is a cricism of the Oxford Group written by an Episcopal Church lady that reads very well as a criticism of the 12-Step groups of today. While "Frank" (Frank Buchman) is gone and not a word is said any more of the Absolutes, the madness carries on today. Written from a decidedly Christian perspective, it exposes the arrogance, hypocracy, and harm done, not only of 70 years ago but in AA and the other Step groups today. You hardly need be Christian to appreciate her honesty, candor and wit. But if you are, even better. — Ken Ragge, Author of More Revealed aka The Real AA

Soul Surgery
by H. A. Walter
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In the 1920s and 30s, a new convert to the Oxford Group could buy this do-it-yourself manual for a few pennies and immediately set to work winning new converts. Supposedly a Christian document, the essence of the book has nothing to do with Christianity but with Buchmanism and the details of their "scientific" program of "soul surgery" or cult indoctrination techniques. The basic fundamental "scientific" principles are greatly refined and still used in modern-day Step groups. — Ken Ragge, Author of More Revealed aka The Real AA

What is the Oxford Group?
by The Layman With the Notebook
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Another book written in the early thirties plainly shows where much of A.A. came from a few years before modern-day A.A.'s claim A.A. began. In the first few words, one will see A.A.'s "the spiritual principle of Anonymity" before there was an A.A. (the book was written anonymously) and a description of the Oxford Group not much different from the way modern-day A.A. describes itself.